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O'Keeffe Clan

Gathering and Rally

9, 10 and 11 Sept 2016

guided tours, lectures

historical and genealogical exhibitions

cultural and musical events,

buffet banquet Saturday evening
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Celebrating Georgia O'Keeffe

At Dromagh Castle 1st May 2007.

A large crowd assembled at the Dromagh Castle to pay tribute to this great artist whos ancestors left the region in 1848. This was the brainchild of Kanturk solicitor Gerard O'Keeffe who is cheftain of the O`Keeffe clan. Mr. John Dillon Kanturk gave an interesting talk on the great artist. Judge Michael Pottwell unveiled a pair of Bronze Hands to the late taneiste and Judge Michael O`Leary and Mr. Dan Joe O`Keeffe welcomed the audience. It is hoped at a future date that those will be an O`Keeffe clan gathering at the castle. Minister Batt O`Keeffe took time off from his election schedule to attend.georgia
Georgia O'Keeffe was born on November 15, 1887, the second of seven children, and grew up on a farm in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin. As a child she received art lessons at home, and her abilities were quickly recognized and encouraged by teachers throughout her school years. By the time she graduated from high school in 1905, O'Keeffe had determined to make her way as an artist.
O'Keeffe pursued studies at the Art Institute of Chicago (1905–1906) and at the Art Students League, New York (1907–1908), where she was quick to master the principles of the approach to art-making that then formed the basis of the curriculum—imitative realism.
In 1908, she won the League's William Merritt Chase still-life prize for her oil painting Untitled (Dead Rabbit with Copper Pot). Shortly thereafter, however, O'Keeffe quit making art, saying later that she had known then that she could never achieve distinction working within this tradition.
Her interest in art was rekindled four years later when she took a summer course for art teachers at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, taught by Alon Bement of Teachers College, Columbia University. Bement introduced O'Keeffe to the then revolutionary ideas of his colleague at Teachers College, artist and art educator Arthur Wesley Dow. georgia 3
Dow believed that the goal of art was the expression of the artist's personal ideas and feelings and that such subject matter was best realized through harmonious arrangements of line, color, and notan (the Japanese system of lights and darks). Dow's ideas offered O'Keeffe an alternative to imitative realism, and she experimented with them for two years, while she was either teaching art in the Amarillo, Texas public schools or working summers in Virginia as Bement's assistant.

O'Keeffe was in New York again from fall 1914 to June 1915, taking courses at Teachers College. By the fall of 1915, when she was teaching art at Columbia College, Columbia, South Carolina, she decided to put Dow's theories to the test. In an attempt to discover a personal language through which she could express her own feelings and ideas, she began a series of abstract charcoal drawings that are now recognized as being among the most innovative in all of American art of the period. She mailed some of these drawings to a former Columbia classmate, who showed them to the internationally known photographer and art impresario, Alfred Stieglitz, on January 1, 1916.

gerard o'keeffe

In 1848, Georgia O`Keeffe`s paternal grandparents, Pierce O`Keeffe and Catherine Mary Shortall, left County Cork and sailed to America. They continued by boat along the Great Lakes to Milwaukee, and then by oxcart to Sun Prairie, Wisconsin. In 1887, Georgia O`Keeffe was born on a dairy farm just outside Sun Prairie to Francis and Ida O`Keeffe, the second of seven brothers and sisters.

See also Georgia O'Keeffe Biography

“I've been absolutely terrified every moment of my life and I've never let it keep me from doing a single thing that I wanted to do.”
― Georgia O'Keeffe
“I have already settled it for myself so flattery and criticism go down the same drain and I am quite free.”
― Georgia O'Keeffe
“Whether you succeed or not is irrelevant, there is no such thing. Making your unknown known is the important thing--and keeping the unknown always beyond you.”
― Georgia O'Keeffe
“Where I was born and where and how I have lived is unimportant. It is what I have done with where I have been that should be of interest.”
― Georgia O'Keeffe
“I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn't say any other way... things I had no words for.”
― Georgia O'Keeffe
“I have things in my head that are not like what anyone taught me — shapes and ideas so near to me,so natural to my way of being and thinking.”
― Georgia O'Keeffe
“Nothing is less real than realism. Details are confusing. It is only by selection, by elimination, by emphasis, that we get at the real meaning of things.”
― Georgia O'Keeffe
“Someone else's vision will never be as good as your own vision of your self. Live and die with it 'cause in the end it’s all you have. Lose it and you lose yourself and everything else. I should have listened to myself.”
― Georgia O'Keeffe